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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Shutt House

ADVOCACY UPDATE!  December 14, 2023: The Islip Town Board is voting on December 14, 2023 on whether to permit the demolition of the Shutt House. Read our letter below to the Islip Town Board asking that they deny the request to modify the current covenants and restrictions that would permit […]

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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Stepping Stones Lighthouse

Why is Stepping Stones Lighthouse historically significant? Stepping Stones Lighthouse is situated in Long Island Sound and is visible from Great Neck, City Island, and the Throgs Neck Bridge. The Stepping Stones are a series of rocks that form a reef at the western end of the Sound. The Second […]

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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Mill Pond House

Why is Mill Pond House historically significant? Built before 1720, the Mill Pond House is one of the oldest surviving dwellings in Oyster Bay. This historic house was constructed on land granted to Henry Townsend in 1661 for the construction of Oyster Bay’s inaugural grist mill, which was then passed […]

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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Eliphalet Whitman Homestead

Why is the Eliphalet Whitman Homestead historically significant? The house was constructed in the mid-18th century for Eliphalet Whitman (1737-1780). The Whitman’s were tanners and owners of a shoe factory. The property consists of the farmhouse, barn, and workshed. The house is a simple one-and-one-half story vernacular-style wood frame building. […]

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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Perkins Electric Generating Mill

ADVOCACY UPDATE! February 7, 2024: PSEG-LI agrees to temporarily delay the demolition of the historic Perkins Electric building in Riverhead that once housed one of Long Island’s first electric power plants.  Read more about this new development in recent press coverage: PSEG-LI agrees to delay demolition of historic power plant […]

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Endangered Historic Places 2023: Coindre Hall Boathouse

Why is the Coindre Hall Boathouse historically significant? Coindre Hall was originally known as West Neck Farm when it was constructed in 1912 for pharmaceutical magnate George McKesson Brown by the noted architect Clarence Sumner Luce. The approximately 135-acre estate consisted of numerous buildings, including a boat house. The boat […]